Coastal German Shepherd Rescue

Phoenix has been adopted! 07-09-2005

Female about 0 old.

Phoenix was given up by a young man who couldn't find a place to live with a large dog. He's about three years old. Phoenix was rather sheltered and is getting used to being around other dogs. Phoenix gets along with dogs about his size who are well mannered and not very playful. We wouldn't trust him around small dogs or cats, and he wouldn't do well with a very playful dog who might jump on him. Phoenix has progressed in his trust of other dogs a lot in the few weeks he's been with Coastal, and we feel that he would do well in a home with an experienced shepherd handler, possibly with calm dogs of his own size.


When Phoenix first arrived at his foster home, he had to be kept separate from his foster brother and had to be leashed and crated. Gradually over a period of a few days, using a crate, leash, baby gates and constant monitoring, he has come to the point where he is very trustworthy and can be left alone with his foster brother during the day. Anyone thinking about adopting Phoenix into a home with another dog will need to be aware that introductions will require caution, time and patience. Phoenix does stand with other dogs just fine on his leash at adoption events, but if a dog gets nose to nose and stares, he is more than willing to mix it up.


Phoenix isn't sure what dog play is all about, although he's more curious every day. He can be a companion to another dog, but to get him as a playmate for another dog in a family would be a leap of faith on the part of his new family. His behavior is the same with both male and female dogs. Some he likes, some he doesn't.


He's a very tall and thin (underweight at the moment) boy with a picture perfect black and tan coat, and his tail is long and full. Phoenix is striking in person and is a gorgeous dog. He is fully house broken (not one mistake), crate trained, takes food politely, and loves to play with his toys. He enjoys walks with his foster brother and will look longingly at his leash, communicating by mental telepathy his NEED for a walk. He also knows his sit and down commands. Phoenix corrects easily with just a voice command. He sleeps quietly through the night, at first on the human bed, of course, but then we're too restless so he moved to his own bed! He just wanted to be sure we weren't going anywhere. Phoenix is great with children, he treats them like small adults.


Kisses!  Kind of anyway.  We call this success!


Phoenix is a very playful boy with humans! He's king of the "catch me if you can" game! You say "I'm going to get you," then prepare yourself for the 90 lb (or will be 90 lb) dog running around your house in circles! If you've got ancient heirloom rugs, you may want to pass. He tends to dig in like a running back on the deciding play to keep that ball out of your hands. The most hysterical part is when he grabs a toy and tries to hide behind the bed, putting his head down so he can't see you! We haven't told him yet, but he's way too tall to hide behind the bed! We're all letting him think he's still a puppy. Phoenix also appears to be able to talk. It could be that his foster mother has finally gone over the edge, but he seems to ask for food, to go for walks, say its time to get up and get his breakfast, and once even to apologize for a misbehavior with another dog. Someone suggested he might have some husky in him because he talks, but we think he's just a chatty boy!

The minimum adoption donation for adults is $375 and the adoption donation for puppies is $500. This amount only partially covers the cost of veterinary care, boarding fees, and other miscellaneous expenses involved in the temporary care and adoption of our dogs and is tax deductible when permitted by law. The adoption donation provides that all dogs will be spayed or neutered, receive current vaccinations, and are microchipped. If not, arrangements will be made on an individual basis ( i.e., puppies who will need to be altered by 6 mos old). Special consideration may be given to those willing to adopt older dogs or dogs with physical problems.